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Development / Stem Cell Biology

Labs associated with

Short Biography:
Dr. Haltiwanger received his B.S. in Biology (1980) and Ph.D. in Biochemistry (1986) from Duke University. He went on to do postdoctoral work at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and took his first independent position as an Assistant Professor in the…

The work in my laboratory deals with the biosynthesis of heme and it regulation. Heme is an essential cofactor for almost all living organisms and participates in a variety of reactions including the regulation central metabolic processes, oxygen binding and transport and reduction/oxidation…

The primary focus of the Pierce laboratory centers on understanding the regulation of intercellular recognition and adhesion, particularly those events that involve protein-oligosaccharide interactions. Almost 20 years ago, observations were made that when vertebrate cells became oncogenically…

The surfaces of all eukaryotic cells are richly endowed with a diverse array of complex glycoconjugates. Therefore, carbohydrate moieties linked to protein, lipid, and glycosaminoglycan form the interfaces at which cell-cell interactions occur. Consistent with their subcellular location and…

Functional diversity increases as you go from DNA to RNA to Proteins. The concept of one gene encodes one gene product is no longer valid. One of the principle ways that diversity is increased is through post-translational modifications of proteins.

Using a combination of methodologies,…

Research Areas

Oxygen Sensing

In addition to its role in driving oxidative metabolism, ambient O2 levels carry information of great interest to cells of both unicellular and multicellular organisms. For example, O2 regulates gene expression and modulates ion transport across…

We study stem cells in skeletal muscle and adipose (fat) tissues and develop therapeutics for muscular dystrophy, muscle atrophy, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. We use transgenic mice and cultured human cells to model human diseases and identify therapeutic agents/approaches.

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